FMDAC


FEDERATION OF METAL DETECTOR AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL CLUBS INC.



FMDAC Disclaimer


FMDAC present this information as a guide / service to the metal detecting community. If you are traveling or are new to the hobby then FMDAC hopes this information is beneficial to you. FMDAC will strive to keep it current however, FMDAC ask for and needs your help in this endeavor. The information was compiled from state regulations and state park department contacts. If the regulations in your state change and you do not see the change here then please notify FMDAC contact. Mark Schuessler, FMDAC ALLIANCE LIAISON *(E-mail)

 

FMDAC recommends that you check with the specific park service you are going to visit in order to be certain of their park regulations. Every state has limitations within parks and some state parks are off limits. Some of the information encountered and the replies from various states were a bit vague and open to interpretation so to be safe check with a state park representative before your visit.

If it is a historical park in any sense of the word then consider it off limits.


Most states require a permit. Check with the state parks department or the park where you intend to visit prior to your planned hunt. Some permits may be available at the park office while others may have to be issued by a regional or state office. A few states charge a fee for the permits.

The information below gives a basic outline. Click on the state name and you will get whatever additional information is available. It may be the actual regulations or the reply received from the State Parks office.

If you find in actual practice or from your own experience that the information here is not correct please let us know. In many cases the regulations indicate that it is up to the park manager. If none of the park managers in a specific state or area will allow metal detecting then FMDAC would like to know.

 

FMDAC assumes no responsibility for any person who knowingly or accidentally violates any state park regulation. Although FMDAC will try to keep this information current we cannot anticipate how each regulation will be interpreted by a specific park department, park employee or other government employee. It is the sole responsibility of each individual to know and obey the regulations of the park or area they are visiting and or metal detecting.


Metal Detecting Summary Table below Allowed, not Allowed or Permit Required

 

Clip on a State or go to the complete state detail below the table to see a specific states response and park regulation link.
Note: If you have a POPUP blocker on turn-off the blocker before clicking on a state it may inhibit the information from displaying.
Metal Detecting  
State Allowed Comment
Alabama Yes With permit from Park Manager
Alaska No Response  
Arizona Yes With permission of Park Ranger
Arkansas Yes On beach areas in some parks with permit from park office.
California Yes With permission from park office.
Colorado Yes With permission from the park manager.
Connecticut Yes Allowed on beach areas. Surface collection only in other areas. Some parks are closed. No permit required
Delaware Yes On beach areas only, east of dune line.
Florida Yes Beach areas only with permission of Park Manager
Georgia No  
Hawaii Yes Beach areas only
Idaho No Metal detecting is OK but you cannot remove anything from the parks.
Illinois Yes With Permit from the park office
Indiana Yes On beach areas only with permission from the Park Manager.
Iowa Yes On beach areas only
Kansas Yes With permission from the park office. Reply stated that you are not allowed to dig but check with the park office on this point.
Kentucky No  
Louisiana No  
Maine Yes With permit from the park office.
Maryland Yes On beach areas only except Point Lookout and Calvert Cliffs. Permit required.
Massachusetts Yes On beach and campsite areas with permission of the Park Supervisor
Michigan Yes Some parks completely open, many have designated areas and some are closed. See the link for detailed info.
Minnesota No  
Mississippi No  
Missouri Yes On beach areas only with permit from DNR headquarters. By mail or email.
Montana No Metal detecting is OK but you cannot remove anything from the parks.
Nebraska Yes On beach areas only below the vegetation line.
Nevada Yes With permit from the park office.
New Hampshire Yes Most areas open unless posted
New Jersey Yes With permit from the Park Superintendent
New Mexico No  
New York Yes On beach areas only with permit from the Park Manager
North Carolina No  
North Dakota No  
Ohio Yes On beach areas. Other areas with permit from the Park Manager
Oklahoma Yes With permit from the park office
Oregon Yes With permit from the park office
Pennsylvania Yes With permission from the park office.
Rhode Island Yes  
South Carolina Yes On beach areas only with permission from the Park Manager
South Dakota Yes With permit from the park office.
Tennessee No  
Texas No  
Utah No  
Vermont Yes With permission from the park office.
Virginia Yes With a permit from the Park Manager
Washington Yes With a permit. Hunting allowed at 67 parks.
West Virginia No Response  
Wisconsin No Only for locating specific lost personal items. A special permit is required.
Wyoming Yes With permit from the Park Superintendent.

 

Park Regulation Detail by State

Thanks to: Mark Schuessler, FMDAC ALLIANCE LIAISON